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Posts tagged ‘Sally Mann’

#16 ANIA VOULOUDI, Thessaloniki (Greece) Street Photographer

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Leica Liker is honored to have Ania Vouloudi, a Thessaloniki (Greece) Street Photographer as our #16 guest.

When I was on the search for photographers that have a unique point of view, several fellow street photographers suggested I look at Ania’s work. You’ll have to agree, when you look at her work, there is a quirkiness that stands out from the crowd.

Ania’s photographs exposes that a flip of a dress or the whisp of hair all have an aesthetic worth looking at. For instance,  the photo below: We’ve all done this.  Swimming, blowing bubbles, and hanging off the edge of the pool.  But the juxtaposition against the other feet and the point of view, makes this very mundane moment a special moment in the memory of a life.

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What attracts me to Ania’s images is that they evoke my own memories. Bringing a warm feeling. So it was serendipitous that Ania speaks of shooting to remember. To remember what she saw. But funny enough, she talks of what she saw is often not what comes across in the photo. We humans walk around with filtered glasses, with our own stories to tell. Hence, we see the world as we want to see it. But the beauty of  life is that it has its own reality. You experience it as one of many. So perhaps more importantly, Ania shoots to remember what she lived.

Back to evoking memories. I love that Ania’s photos spark the collective sharing of insignificant moments in our lives. Moments that we will undoubtedly forget when we become older. For instance, lying on the grass in the sun, a girl climbing up a door frame, a ball bouncing in front of a window, dogs walking by and growling at each other. The creation of human history – cell by cell, second by second, frame by frame . It is what makes us human.

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Here is my interview with ANIA VOULOUDI:

Nick Name: none
Currently living in: moving between Thessaloniki, Greece and Rethymnon, Crete
Motto: Bukowski’s “Don’t  try
Street Photographer since: 2009

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Profession/Job: Construction Engineer
Websites: www.aniavouloudi.com and http://www.flickr.com/photos/vouloudi/
Organizations  or  Group:  None

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Favorite Street Camera & Lens: Canon 550D with a canon 24mm f/2.8 lens
Back-up Street Camera & Lens: Canon 400D with a cosinon 28mm f/2.0 lens
Favorite photography gadget: Built-in flash

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Favorite street food: Kinder Bueno
Do you listen to music while shooting? No. I want to be able to hear what I shoot.
Favorite music when shooting and/or editing Photos: Rebetika when I edit.
Favorite photo software: Lightroom 2.7, Photoshop CS6

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3 Favorite Master Photographers: I don’t have any. I haven’t searched, so I don’t remember who is who. But I have seen an exhibition of Sally Mann. I once took a quick look at a Diane Arbus’ book and as a kid I had a poster of Doisneau’s kiss. I remember something from them and they are three. But not my favorite, yet.
3 Favorite Contemporary Photographers: Todd Fisher, Kate Kirkwood, Charalampos Kydonakis, Laura Rodari. I can exclude none.
Which 3 photographers’ prints do you own? I own many of my father’s. He used to shoot the family. His photos are wonderfully raw as anyone’s who does it effortlessly.

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Color or Black and White?  Color. I see color, I shoot color.
Shoot Film or Digital ? I have seen nothing digital being as beautiful as anything analogue. But I can’t wait and have no money to spend on film.
Is there a special time of the day you like to shoot or is any time good? Anytime.

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How did you get into photography? When I was a kid, my father used to share with me his Zenit and afterwards his cheap little snap shot camera. I think many people start this way.

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When I was in college, I never really enjoyed the field of my studies and realized I needed a hobby. Then I saw a pamphlet of photography lessons and convinced myself it was fate. I guess that if I would have seen a pamphlet of cooking lessons I would now be an amateur chef. So, I followed this random fate and found myself amongst housewives who needed better photos of their grandchildren, policemen who needed better photos of the corpses and co-students who were bored, too. We had a great time, we didn’t do much photography, I didn’t go there often but all that made me buy a Nikon f65 in 2007. I went to these lessons for 2 years. In the second year I got a loan from the bank and bought a Canon 400D with a 50mm lens but that lens was a bad choice as I always had to stand far away.

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I actually got into photography much later around 2009-2010, I learnt what even my camera can do after I had quit those lessons and I recently ended up with a 24mm which allows me to be myself and get closer.

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Why did you choose Street Photography and not another form of photography or stamp collecting? I don’t feel that I have chosen any form of photography and I collect stamps, too.

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How do you define street photography? All I know is that it has no literal meaning. Street can be the park in front of your house, the morning route to your job, your grandmother’s backyard, the underground parking of a building or the shopping mall. It can be your home, your kitchen, your dog, the sea, museums and airplanes, massage rooms and carpet stores.

The truth is that I don’t really like labeling photos. I don’t care if a photo is called street or posed or unposed or who is in the photo etc. If I like it, it has a reason to exist, it’s part of the photographer and it can take no label on it. What is street and what is unposed? Is “street” shooting strangers? My photos do not include only strangers. Does “posed”mean that you put everything in the order you want? I never know what order will come up in a photo. I care for the feelings that a photo can cause, I care for the visual result not for the description of it in words.

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What motivates you to photograph the streets? I shoot to remember things. To remember how I used to see. Memory makes you what you are.  About the streets, I like the fact that I don’t decide what goes where and almost nothing is under my control.

Is Street Photography an obsession? Photography yes. Street no. I don’t shoot regularly and I rarely shoot “street”. Friends tell me to shoot more. I guess I should. The more you search the more possibilities of finding what you are searching for.

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Are you a lone shooter or do you like shooting with friends or a group? I can’t concentrate when I’m with others.

Are you an invisible photographer or visible? I feel invisible. But it can’t be.
Favorite street photography city: Rethymnon. It’s a small town on the island of Crete that changes every day.

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What inspires your photography? I’m often inspired by boredom. When I’m trapped in traffic, or in the waiting room of a doctor’s office, when I am at a wedding of an unknown cousin or when I have to mop, I shoot.

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Is there a philosophy, concept or aesthetic behind your compositions that you apply to your photos? The true answer is no. But if I were a 3rd person looking at it from a bird’s eye point of view, maybe I could come up with a philosophy or a concept behind it.

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Do you think working on buildings and engineering might have influenced your view of the world?  I have never thought about it. I shoot what I like. I don’t know what influences my photography or when it might be. I suppose everything:  my dog, friends, parents, what I eat. Everything.

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Can you describe your style? Do I have a style? I don’t know if I have a specific style. You can probably answer the question better than I can.

How has it changed over time? It constantly changes? Nothing can stay same. When I am happy my images are happy. When I am pessimistic they are also pessimistic. I grow up, they grow up, too.

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What do you look for in a good photograph by you and others? To feel like I haven’t seen it before; to be something that I am or can be.

How do you go about shooting a street photograph? Sometimes I run and strive and sometimes it happens unconsciously like breathing.

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Could you please describe the process – what was going on in your mind when you first started to think to take the following image all the way until you pressed the shutter release? I had to take photos for the exhibition we had with Charalampos Kydonakis and Lukas Vasilikos last year. It was difficult to exhibit with great photographers who already had a bunch of photos for the subject of the exhibition while I didn’t. So, I had to search almost every day for them.

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One day, I came across with an upside down chair. I thought it could be something but not by itself. After I spent time shooting distant, boring humans passing by, a white dog came to me. I started petting it and then a black dog appeared. They were growling at each other but when I see this photo I tend to forget it. Reality differs from what I see or want to see. It is what I like about photography.

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How do you use flash and not feel like you are intruding? You use flash even in the day – is it to give more luminance?  When I use the flash during the day, people don’t understand what is going on. When the flash goes off, they look behind them at the direction that I pretend to look, too. At night, I do the same and hope they will act the same. If not, I use the smile. And if not, I use the “ I-am-a-tourist smile”.  And if not, I’m gone.

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As for luminance, I like light. I like everything to be bright and in the same light value. I guess the aim is to have everything visible. Another reason is the settings. I don’t enjoy spending time on finding the right ones at night or indoors, so with my same, lazy, favorite settings and my flash on I get what I want.

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How do you choose your shots when you edit? What tells you that the shot is good? Instinct. But I can’t always l trust it. People are emotionally attached with what they create, so sometimes I ask the opinion of people and photographers I trust. It’s another talent to be able to choose.

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Best 3 tips for shooting the streets:  Tips are useless. People can do whatever they want. They should and they will.
Best single advice on how to improve your work: Take as less photos as you can.
Best single advice on how to edit your work. Delete as many photos as you can.
Best single advice for someone who wants to get into street photography: If you have made the decision and you are aware that you are getting into street photography, do not.

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What’s the best moment in your street photography career? Every time I see a good photo in my camera.

What’s the worst moment in your street photography career? The worst moments come when I don’t shoot for a while.

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What projects are you working on? I’m working on my little cousin. I haven’t seen her for a long time and now we spend time together. I also realized that I have an ongoing project with a lost toenail of mine, but I still have time before the new one will come out. The surgeon had to take it out and granted me a three months project.

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Where do you want to be in 5 years with regard to street photography? Still shooting is a fine goal.

Are there exhibitions planned in the future? No.

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Leica Liker thanks Ania for sharing her experience and inspirational advice with us. We look forward to checking in with her in the future.

You can check out Ania’s gear in “Liker Bags’n Gear” here.

This is Ania’s self portrait.

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# 13 KATE KIRKWOOD, Lake District (United Kingdom) “Rural” Street Photographer


Leica Liker is honored to have Kate Kirkwood, a Lake District (United Kingdom) ‘Rural’ Street Photographer as our #13 guest. Also Leica Liker’s second female photographer!

I think you will agree, when we speak of street photography, the first images or thoughts that come to mind are primarily humans interacting in city centers or city street scenes. Most likely because the majority of people live in cities. So the probability of photographs shot and published are naturally taken by city folk in their natural habitat. And if you are lucky to be living in the countryside or are a roving photographer, you might be shooting some from rural areas. Like Henri Cartier-Bresson who took photos of pigs looking out of their pigsty in Holland, a lone duck floating down a stream in the countryside of France or three geese walking towards an abandoned windmill on the plains of Tralee, Ireland. There’s a few rural life photographers out there. But these photographs are far and few between. Even the Flickr group, “Rural Street Photography”,  has just a handful of members. So when I was introduced to Kate’s work, it was like looking at gems.


Kate’s photographs gently leads us into the intimate life of northwest England, where the landscape is a national treasure. It is also the home of romantic poet William Wordsworth and children’s book writer Beatrix Potter, the creator of Peter Rabbit. Their words and drawings conjure images of bucolic England. Kate’s images aspire to the same.

Surrounded by pure unquieted landscape and animals, where humans are far and few between, the idyllic life has definitely helped shape Kate’s vision of the world. The rich colors and raking light combined with powerful compositions showcases her emphasis of animals and humans living in harmony with nature, giving landscape photography new life. More importantly, she has been able to offer her unique definition of rural street photography.

an·thro·po·mor·phic  [an-thruh-puh-mawr-fik] adjective
Ascribing human form or attributes to a being or thing not human, especially to a deity.

However, what really draws you into Kate’s work is the unique voice she has given to her subjects, especially animals. Kate talks about looking for the “minuscule, heightened moments in rural spaces, where seemingly little happens…” Whether it is two doves having a chat about their day as they cross the country lane, or the silent response to her car light on a lamb caught enjoying a private moment. Subtle humorous moments. Each character has its own secret life.

Through Kate’s eyes, we can see a complex story being lived. We realize that, like humans, animals have a deep intelligence. Their lives are unwittingly anthropomorphized through her lens. And our empathy comes from connecting their daily routine with ours.

When you look at Kate’s work, you can’t help but feel you’ve shared a glimpse of ‘sublime life’. As if to say, as stewards of earth, we have a responsibility to respect all living beings. Perhaps it’s because Kate understands the devastation of prejudice when she and her ex-husband published anti-apartheid literature in their past. Or maybe it’s because she lives in a remote area where she interacts with animals more than with humans. Most likely all of the above. The result is not ‘minuscule moments’ as she modestly comments, but a profound look into the richness of life at its simplest.

Here’s my interview with KATE KIRKWOOD:

Nick Name:  None
Currently living in: The Lake District, United Kingdom
Motto: Never seek what you’re expecting; set your camera and your heart to serendipity.

Street Photographer since: 2007-ish
Do you have formal photography training? No I don’t.  I run a Bed and Breakfast where I live and had some fishermen stay with me who were gear heads. It was interesting overhearing them talk about equipment and techie things for hours, despite most of it going over my head. I try to keep up with developments, but things move fast. I think I have enough basic  knowledge of how to use the camera so I can just get on with actually looking at the world. Perhaps I’m missing some tricks, but my primary pleasure is in fishing for images, trying things out, and then seeing what I’ve caught that day. I don’t mind bumbling along, learning as I go.

Profession/Job: Book production/design
Websites: www.katekirkwood.com
Organizations or Group:  None

Favorite Street Camera & Lens: Simply what I have: A Nikon D60 with a Nikkor 18-55mm lens.
Back-up Street Camera & Lens: Ha ha, my old little Fuji E900 P&S, which is held together with tape. I’m not very good on the techie side of things and find the options and discussions of such things overwhelming. I prefer a simple camera, simple settings (I use ‘Programme’ mostly), and concentrating on subjects.
Favorite photography gadget: A large farmer’s raincoat that I can zip up over my camera.
Favorite street food:  A pocket of salted licorice, if I’m lucky.

Do you listen to music while shooting?   Sometimes, but my old Shuffle went in the wash last week so that’s kiboshed that.
Favorite music when shooting and/or editing Photos: All sorts – Bach; PJ Harvey; Cinematic Orchestra; Mercedes Sosa; Cocorosie; Bill Evans; Lou Reid, Schoenberg Anouar Brahem; the Pixies…. I’m listening to Jocelyn Pooks as I write.
Favorite photo software:   I’ve only ever used Photoshop and I currently have version CS5.

3 Favorite Master Photographers:   Only three? I’d like to mention Helen Levitt, Fay Godwin and Ruth Orkin as there are few women in the usual lists and organisations. There are many whose photographs I look at again and again.  I love Robert Frank, Saul Leiter, Ernst Haas, many others … (and of course HCB goes without saying).

3 Favorite Contemporary Photographers:   Only three? How about Pentti Sammallahti, Sally Mann and Josef Koudelka.


Which 3 photographers’ prints do you own? It would be easier to answer the question ‘Which three prints would you like to own?’ I have wonderful prints from my photographer boyfriend who is one of the best in the street field. Otherwise, I have plenty of well-loved postcards of favourite images on my pinboards – does that count? And a lovely poster of Sirkka-Liisa Kontinnen’s photo ‘Girl on a Spacehopper’, and one by Lee Miller from a V&A exhibition.

Color or Black and White? Colour, though I’d like to play with monochrome.

Shoot Film or Digital? Digital. For me the absolute magic of the immediacy of digital still thrills; I remember very clearly the afternoon that someone showed me a small point-and-shoot in operation for the first time.  It was as riveting and exciting as the occasion, when, as a small child, I saw a zoetrope in action. I began trying to photograph more than just family snaps in the age of digital so it was hardly a consideration, and it’s more affordable and simpler, though I’d love to experiment with older cameras.

Is there a special time of the day you like to shoot or is any time good? I enjoy shooting in the first and the last light of day; right at the edges.

How do you define street photography?  Perhaps many genres can be “street” if you don’t determine what you’re going to shoot before hand. A few years ago I had the experience of seeing the best photographic exhibition in my life; was a huge show of Henri Cartier-Bresson’s work. I was immediately afflicted, I wanted to try this art, street photography, too.  But where I live, I see the postman once a day and sometimes I don’t see anyone else for days. When I go to the city, the best treat is to simply wander the streets. However, because I live out in a rural area, I enjoy what I have, approaching moments and unfolding spaces in rural spaces with the mindset of a street photographer, even though I don’t live in a place with people. I suppose I try for a kind of rural street photography, although I’m also trying to find fresh ways with the possibilities of landscape photography.

Street photography requires an abandoned sense of wonderment, an openness. But you can’t just click away and assume that the act in itself will muster up an image. It’s so rare; it’s that little crucial moment that I think might be symbolized by the way Cartier-Bresson used to pop up on his tippy toes as he pressed the shutter. Seldom, if ever, can I claim to have snaffled what Roland Barthe’s calls ‘punctum’. Street photography offers a kind of slow accretion of modest wisdom. The more you photograph, the keener your observation, the more you notice about the world … perhaps you grow a little wiser each time because you’re in a state of watching out.

Decades ago I was involved with an anti-apartheid publishing house my then husband ran and some of the ground-breaking young photographers of that time in Johannesburg had a dark room at the back of the place and they offered my first understanding of what documentary photography is about. I often consider and puzzle over the difference between documentary and street photography. Documentary photography has a responsibility while street photography doesn’t. Yet it tells a lot of truths. Street brings attention to our foibles and reminds us of delight. It’s lovely to go to exhibitions of street photographers you know and see the public responding to the delight in everyday life.  It’s like enhancing all the little things that happen when we don’t have our cameras.

I’m not so keen on street photography which is malicious, grossly intrusive or that pokes fun at vulnerable people. I prefer and enjoy photographs which are taken with a kind of tenderness and respect. This is a tricky differentiation; I enjoy much of Martin Parr’s work and he’s a great one at poking fun, of celebrating our ludicrious possibilities. Perhaps it should be celebratory rather than derisory, although I strongly believe we should always deride misused or misplaced power….

Some of your images remind us of the comic strips of Gary Larson, where the animals take on human or at least anthropomorphic intelligence. Is that how you see them? Perhaps. I have this one very tame hen that sits next to me when I am in the sun. So I painted her nails. One day a builder was here fixing the chimney and after a cup of tea and a chat he bounced off in his van and ten minutes later he came bouncing back and in a rather matter of fact way handed me the hen through his window. She had got into the van and settled down in the passenger seat when he wasn’t looking. I suppose she wanted a little expedition.  Yes, animals have huge intelligence but it’s of their own complex sort. I love being in a position to try and capture some of that.

Why did you choose Street Photography and not another form of photography or stamp collecting? To me Street is more an attitude than a genre, a way of encountering the world, without too many preconceptions, wherever one happens to be. It invites intuition rather than rationality; it requires an emotional response before an understanding. I also love the excitement of anticipation, seeing a moment coming.… What I do to earn a living requires planning, organization, parameters, words; wandering around with my camera is an antidote to that. We don’t have to prepare anything, and we don’t have to tell the whole story – suggestion and puzzlement are good intentions.

What motivates you to photograph the streets? The world is a different place when we’ve a camera in our hand. I love having this reason to be out in the world, in the sun and the rain, instead of hunched at my computer where I spend my working day. It’s a bit like taking a dog for a walk. I live a quiet life in the countryside and when I get out the world has a wam-bam! impact on me. I think, crikey! look at what’s going on, look at what all these people or dogs or cows or buses or road signs are up to! What havoc, what strange order, too…Photographing out there is a sort of gesture of love; kind of blowing a kiss to the world.

Is Street Photography an obsession? Perhaps, yes. I drive with my camera on my lap. I feel undressed if I chance out of the door without it, and return in panic to fetch it.

Are you a lone shooter or do you like shooting with friends or a group? I find it a meditative practice – if that doesn’t sound too pretentious – best carried out alone. I get into a ‘dwaal’, as Afrikaners say. But I take my camera where ever I go, whether I’m in company or not; I just don’t go on group shoots. I don’t go on ‘shoots’ per se, I just take my camera along in life.

Favorite street photography city: I don’t get about much, and photograph mostly in rural areas. I enjoy the quirky small towns on the coast near where I live, and I get to London when I can.

What inspires your photography? I think everything we encounter can inform our photography; current politics for example. I enjoy all sorts of art and literature and go to galleries when I can, and if I can’t, well, I count myself fortunate that I have Google Search and the Internet, which can be like making a big Christmas pudding every day; loads and loads of ingredients at our fingertips! Recently I saw Grayson Perry’s tapestries; and marveled at the small details of contemporary life he’s observed in them. I also saw Munch’s paintings and was very moved and also inspired by the daring and photographic points of view in his compositions.  Things I’ve read recently? Will Self’s  Psychogeography was big for me, as was Gaston Bachelard’s Poetics of Space. Of course I read a couple of blogs, and I try to find out what other photographers are saying, and enjoy their biographies, but mostly I soak up their images, as much as I can and as often as I can.

Is there a philosophy, concept or aesthetic behind your compositions that you apply to your photos? I suppose the isolation. In the last 4 years I’ve been mostly on my own here. Roaming around the area is very solitary. There is a state of grace to be learned from that. England is a small, crowded place but the gaps of space and silence and minimalism are there. I find it easier to compose with simpler and fewer elements.

When I am in London I like to go out early in the morning. If you go out to somewhere like Oxford street in the middle of the day and people stream by you can invariably dredge up  an image. But perhaps because I am used to country life, I find the empty streets of the early hours more manageable. Maybe it’s a bit of a cop-out, but I find myself doing it.

On the other hand, I have a problem with some landscape photography which is often quite dull or clichéd. Landscape images become beautiful or beguiling or special when something unique happens in them, when the photographer invests some emotional intelligence in her or his summoning of the landscape.  Some of Ansel Adams’ photographs manage that; a small spark, that tiny black horse, a living spirit.

Do you think your work in typography, proofreading and publishing  has an impact on how you shoot and view street photographs? Perhaps because I’m making decisions about color, line and form in the earning work. The world can be compositionally structured through a viewfinder much like the graphics on a page. I work on academic books, mostly about Africa and global issues So I often browse for images for book covers and illustrations, looking through stock photos, finding fresh elements for design.

What do you look for in a good photograph by others and by yourself? A difficult question, often asked. I know the effect of a good photograph: it’s a sort of searing prod, like with a branding iron; a prod in the head or a prod in the heart or even the funny-bone; and then the day is different after that.…

How do you go about shooting a street photograph? I do not have a plan or a way of doing things. I just make sure I have my camera and that the battery is charged, and I try to remember to check that I haven’t left exposure compensation on, which I frequently do! I simply take my camera along and don’t feel a desperation to find a shot, to make a catch. I take quite a lot of photos while en route on country roads – grinding to a halt, reversing, causing mahem, plunging into muddy fields ….

How do you go about composing a shot? If there’s time I’ll check if there’s an alternative point of view; an element that could be included, a framing shape I might not have seen at first. I once took a landscape photograph, which ended up in the Tate archives, of a farmhouse and snowy mountains in the background, but I was bothered by some pesky black silage bags and old tyres cluttering the foreground. Then, as I adjusted my position, I realized that filling half the frame with this detritus actually made a better photo. This can happen in street situations, when you take a few shots and then notice that things might line up or juxtapose or create a better shot if you just shift a little. But you need the luxury of time for that. Mostly taking a photo is a sort of blurred panic.

Best 3 tips for shooting the streets): When I got my little DSLR a friend picked it up to admire it and promptly threw the lens cap in the bin. ‘You won’t be needing that’, he said, ‘you won’t take street photographs with a lens cap on’. So perhaps that’s some good advice: throw away your lens cap and get a UV filter to protect your lens instead. Another tip I learned is to carry on shooting even after it feels like a moment is over. I’ve found that if a person who’s in my shot is curious or put out by my including them they mellow if I try find something nice or respectful to say, to explain that I thought they looked wonderful there in that light, or that I liked their nice jumper or that their kiss looked so loving.

Best single advice on how to improve your work: I don’t really like the word ‘work’; people who toil away in paddy fields or down mines or in garment factories do ‘work’. We photographers who’re not doing it to earn bread or rent, are just enjoying ourselves, making our projects, dilly-dallying, learning to look and understand a little more.

Best single advice on how to edit your work:  I spend some of my working time cutting and paring book texts down to the bones, and it’s good to try to do this with photographs. I find it a good challenge to be really strict and honest with myself when it comes to sorting through images. You know that an image is actually not very good, you just do, and it’s better not to try to persuade yourself it is and to just move on. So being ruthless helps. Distilling, from a big fat mush of stuff, just one brief succinct or poetic phrase.

Best single advice for someone who wants to get into street photography: I’m not sure what you mean by ‘get into’. There’s no right way to do it, no club, no certificates. Just walk out with a camera and see what happens.  It’s fun to share the results and learn from others on websites like Flickr, to become savvy and enter competitions and things, but it can get hectic and misleading.

What’s the best moment in your street photography career? It’s not a ‘career’, it’s a hobby really; I don’t have grand ambitions. I do take it seriously and am passionate about it, but I have no pretensions to a career. Street photography is not really about that; even master street photographers do mostly commercial work to survive. The delight in getting a satisfying photo is a very rare and ‘best’ moment, every time.

What’s the worst moment in your street photography career? I haven’t had any ‘worst’ moment I don’t think. Being shooed off down the street in a local town by two big lads who could shout ‘fuck off’ and fire half-eaten chips from their mouths simultaneously was a bit exciting.

Other than that, because I live in a small community, the people, farmers, are all generally wary about being photographed. The older folks aren’t too bothered by it but the younger ones are.

What projects are you working on? With street images things perhaps become projects as they accumulate. I am also trying to start a couple of documentary projects about things that I feel are important and if anything I’d hope to develop in that direction.

Where do you want to be in 5 years with regard to street photography? Simply to still be looking, snapping and learning for the enjoyment of it. With perhaps a little more technical savvy and perhaps a project I’m proud of…

Are there exhibitions planned in the future? A small presentation in Amsterdam, and a selection in Life Force magazine are coming up soon.

Leica Liker thanks Kate for sharing her experience and inspirational advice with us. We look forward to checking in on her in the future.

We also want to thank Richard Bram for introducing Kate to us.

You can check out Kate’s gear in “Liker Bags ‘n Gear” here.

Here is Kate’s self portrait.

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